Para Sports

para sports
para sports
para sports
para sports
para sports
para sports
para sports
team wales lawn bowls
team wales table tennis joshua stacey

Commonwealth Games is the only competition where able bodied and disabled athletes compete together in a fully inclusive sporting event. Para sports were introduced to the Commonwealth Games in Manchester 2002, competing in athletics, table tennis, lawn bowls, swimming and weightlifting.

The Gold Coast 2018 Games  had a record 300 para athletes competing, a 45% increase in athletes compared to the previous Games in 2014. The swimming and athletics programme also doubled in size at the 2018 Games.

Team Wales’ first Para medals were in Lawn Bowls and Swimming in 2002. These athletes were David Roberts (swimming) + Triples, Men, Lawn Bowls: Derek Dowling, John Gronow, Kevin Woolmore.

Team Wales have won a total of 12 para sport medals since it’s launch in 2012. These medals were won by Hollie Arnold, Olivia Breen, Julie Thomas, Gilbert Miles, James Ball, Joshua Stacey, Beverley Jones, Jenny McLoughlin, Aled Davies, Rhys Jones and Jack Thomas.

  • Hollie Arnold won gold in the javelin and broke the world record at the 2018 Games.
  • Olivia Breen was one of two athletes who won 2 medals in the 2018 Gold Coast Games – gold in the Long Jump and bronze in the 100m.
  • Julie Thomas and Gilbert Miles won VI Pairs bronze in Lawn Bowls.
  • James Ball competes in cycling and won two silvers in 2018. He was the first athlete from Team Wales to win a para sports medal in 2018.
  • Joshua Stacey competes in table tennis and won bronze at the 2018 Games.

For para-athletes to compete, a classification panel assess which sport class the athlete fits into. They state that the idea behind sport classes is that being able to group athletes with similar ‘activity limitations’ means that they can compete more equitably. This means that sport classes differ among sports, and as such, sports classes do not comprise athletes with the same impairment. If different impairments cause similar activity limitations, then these athletes can compete together. Therefore, you see athletes with one arm competing with athletes with one leg and vice versa.

Around 16,000 people with a disability in Wales are registered at a sports club.

There are hundreds of sports clubs across Wales that offer disability-specific or disability-inclusive opportunities.

www.disabilitysportwales.com